Wednesday, August 29, 2007

That was interesting

And rather fun. This year, we had a new coordinator for the orientation and she did thing a little differently. All staff and first year students met and had a quick meeting and key people were pointed out to them. Then we took advantage of the beautiful morning and went outside to do a few "ice breaker" exercises. The first exercise was that everyone was given a list of ten people to fine, such as, Find someone who... likes beets, has more than 4 siblings, speaks another language besides English and French, has a pet other than a cat or dog, has a mother named Annabelle, plays the bagpipes, etc., and you had to find someone who could answer yes to each item.
Then we were formed into two circles, one inside the other and we faced each other. The inner circle went clockwise and the outer circle went counterclockwise. It turned out to be sort of like musical circles because they had music playing and when it stopped, you stopped and had a conversation with whoever was in front of you.

The last thing we did was a line dance like you see in movies like "Pride and Prejudice". It was interesting and very chaotic, and it was also accompanied by a lot of laughter.

Then it was time for the studio tours. The students were broken up into groups of about ten and each group started their tour in a different studio. This year's students are a good mix of fresh out of high school and mature students. I generally love the mature students because they know that they have to work to do well. They know that a passing grade will not be handed to them just because they paid tuition. They generally are better note takers and are better organized. Generally. There are exceptions to every rule.

This afternoon was taken up with a studio meeting and a bit more cleaning.

I certainly hope that we get a good bunch of them interested in the Fiber Arts studio. And I hope that some stay after Christmas.

2 comments:

kneek said...

I've been waiting for you to mention the name of the college where you teach? What sort of program is it?

DaviMack said...

If they don't like it, they're crazy. :) You could always bring fiber arts to Scotland - they've certainly got quite a heritage of it, and have certainly let it slide in many places.